The previous video encouraged you to experiment with the colors of a character design. What about the color of the lines themselves? This time I invite you to take the same illustration and to experiment with colored lines. Black lines have their place, but you can add nuance to your images with intentionally colored lines. And if you like this video, please remember to click the "Like" button at the bottom of the post!  The only advertising for Ctrl+Paint is word of mouth, so I'm counting on you guys to spread the word.  Thanks!

Assignment: Experiment with colored linework the provided character designs.

Things to consider: Soft vs. Hard Materials, Lock Transparent Pixels

Recommended videos:Basic Color Schemes, Unify Your Palette, Alternative Masking pt.1 (Lock Transparent Pixels)

Worksheet Downloads:Gorilla character Worksheet

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AuthorMatt Kohr
CategoriesDesign
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One of the best ways to learn about color and color relationships is to play. In this exercise, I invite you to use my illustration as a coloring book, and see what happens when you try different combinations and arrangements. Though the digital painting you end up with is not a portfolio piece, using my provided linework should keep you focused on the task at hand: changing the colors. And if you like this video, please remember to click the "Like" button at the bottom of the post!  The only advertising for Ctrl+Paint is word of mouth, so I'm counting on you guys to spread the word.  Thanks!

Assignment: Experiment with color schemes on the provided character designs.

Things to consider: Complementary and Analogous Schemes, Lock Transparent Pixels

Recommended videos:Basic Color SchemesUnify Your PaletteAlternative Masking pt.1 (Lock Transparent Pixels)

Worksheet Downloads:Gorilla character Worksheet

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AuthorMatt Kohr
CategoriesDesign
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If you've ever created a silhouette sketch for a character design, what did you do next? All too often artists will consider these sketches in a binary way - each drawing is either a 'hit' or a 'miss', and they draw until a 'hit' happens. This video offers a modified approach to thumbnail sketching - using Photoshop masks to help quickly iterate on a single promising thumbnail.  As I mention in the video, much of this idea originally came from the fantastic book The Skillful Huntsman, so make sure you check that out. 

Recommended video: The Danger of Painting Silhouettes

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AuthorMatt Kohr
CategoriesDesign
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To get the most out of digital painting you'll need to let the computer do some of the work for you. Repeated objects are a great opportunity for Photoshop to shine, and this video shows how you can do real-time design using the 'smart objects' command.  Unike traditional painting where you work from the beginning sketch to a finished painting, the digital process operates in a less linear way.  If you can wrap your head around the possibilities, you'll end up saving time and achieving fantastic results!
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AuthorMatt Kohr
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Exaggeration is not only for cartoonists and caricature artists.   This video explores some of the practical benefits of exaggeration in your sketching and research drawings.  Also, it's fun!

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AuthorMatt Kohr
CategoriesDesign, Drawing
Tagsstyle
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Controlling the viewer's eyes in your illustration is important - and some simple framing elements will often help in this effort. "Framing element" simply means a large object in the foreground that surrounds the subject, like a frame around a picture.

If you like learning about composition, you should also check out the "Principles of Design" series.

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AuthorMatt Kohr
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If you're wokring to improve your painting, reference is a necessity.  The question is not "should I paint from reference?"  but rather "What reference makes most sense for this piece?"  This video looks for painting reference in an unusual area: visual effects test renders. 

If you're looking for the search terms mentioned in the video, here's a good starting point: Global Illumination (GI), Ambient Occlusion (AO), Caustics, Photons, VRay, Mental Ray, and Radiosity.  Search any of those along with "test render", and you'll have some fun reference materials. 

The anatomy reference was found at onlinelifedrawing.com

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AuthorMatt Kohr
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Choosing a few pieces of art to represent yourself is a challenge.  What pieces should you include?This video considers the challenge in terms of your end goal, and the person reviewing your work. Like it or not, the portfolio you choose to present to the world says a lot about you, and can have a big impact on your art career.

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AuthorMatt Kohr
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"Realistic painting" often means "realistic surfaces". If you want to improve the level of realistic detail in your paintings, this premium video (available in the store) is for you. It deals with two primary methods for adding detail: by hand with custom brushes, and with photo overlays. These methods are described in a very versatile way, and will work for any sort of illustration or concept art.

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AuthorMatt Kohr
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Making these videos has been a great experience, and it's probably time to introduce myself. After all, we're 100 videos in. I'm trying my best to sculpt ctrl+Paint in a way that represents my art experience. I've had two major formative experiences: 1) Self-Teaching. All of my software experience has been self taught, and I've never attended a painting class. As a result, I know how hard it can be to learn a new skill without a teacher.

2) Art School. I was lucky enough to attend the Savannah College of Art and Design, which gave me 4 dedicated years of art education. This was a totally different level than taking a few art classes in high school - I was living art. Though art school is absolutely not required, if you can go... it's a lot of fun.

Ctrl+Paint is my attempt to join these two concepts: self-teaching and art school. So if you're looking for either of those two experiences, you're in the right place. Thanks for being an awesome community!1

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AuthorMatt Kohr
90 CommentsPost a comment

Color is relative. Depending on the surrounding colors, ambient light in the room, and a variety of other factors - your results will vary. This video explores the idea of relative color, and suggests some tips for carefully observing color. Training your eye to carefully ovserve color is challenging, but very worthwhile. Good luck! If you want to see the earlier video mentioned in the post, here it is -- "guess that color" 

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AuthorMatt Kohr
19 CommentsPost a comment